Confidence in a confident God pic

By: Camellia Lynn(February 2011)

Do we accept as truth the words spoken by King David in Psalm 139:14, that I am “fearfully and wonderfully made”?  Or have these words become another meaningless cliché?  Perhaps these were the words on King David’s lips as he greeted each morning or before he’d lay down to sleep each night.  It’s possible he repeated them so much that he actually embodied them.  He had become his words!  The words alone were meaningless, without power.  The source to whom these words had been addressed was the power that stirred them to action in David’s life: God was the source who fueled David’s self esteem.  While self-esteem may simply mean the value one places on his or herself in terms of explanation, who the source is and what the source provides can and will impact an individual all the days of his or her life.

To King David, the words “fearfully and wonderfully made” had not become meaningless clichés as scripture has for many of us.  We have become as detached from scripture as a retina is when it detaches from an eye.  And as a result, we’re left half blind, groping around and trying to feel our way through life.  In addition, the words have no impact on us, we can’t meditate on them, embrace them, embody them, nor breathe them in which would allow us to ultimately become them.  This was not David’s experience.  King David had confidence in a confident God from whom he drew his self esteem.  He had acknowledged God as the source of his uniqueness!  David knew something about the sincerity of God’s heart towards men because in Psalm 8:3-4, he states “When I consider the heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars…what is man that you are mindful of him….”? Despite David’s shortcomings, his failed attempts during his life, and even his slipping and sliding, he had confidence in who he was and remained confident in the God to whom he belonged.  Because of his acceptance of God’s truth, he remained a man after God’s own heart.

Remember, at this point in David’s life, he’s already slay-ed his Goliath, shepherded his sheep, befriended Jonathan, evaded Saul, reigned over Israel, coveted Bathsheba; murdered Uriah, laid before God pleading for his infant son’s life which God took, struggled with a dysfunctional family and had his kingship challenged by a way-ward son.  Amidst these trying times, David always managed to turn back to God and seek his forgiveness – regardless.  He knew he was not his circumstances.  He knew that the God of the universe had formed him in his mother’s womb, shaped him, equipped him, and ordained him with purpose.

So, like King David, we must acknowledge and accept who God wants to be to us through faith in Jesus Christ.  Then, we must surrender our will to His.